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Bewertungen für Rakuten

Aktualisiert am 17. Oktober 2017
434 Bewertungen

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Befürworten Geschäftsführer
Rakuten Chairman and CEO Hiroshi Mikitani
Hiroshi Mikitani
221 Bewertungen

434 Mitarbeiter-Bewertungen

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  1. Hilfreich (5)

    „Hohe Fluktuation, wenig Vertrauen”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter in Berlin (Deutschland)
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter in Berlin (Deutschland)
    Neutrale Prognose

    Ich habe in Vollzeit bei Rakuten gearbeitet (Weniger als ein Jahr)

    Pros

    Einzigartiges Geschäftsmodell, welches jedoch nicht uneingeschränkt global funktioniert. Unternehmen mit "geschlossenem" Eco-System inkl. eig. Finanzhäuser. Wenig transparente Unternehmensstrategie.

    Kontras

    Zu viele unbezahlte Überstunden. Unzureichende interne Kommunikation. Viel zu kurzfristige Wachstumsstrategien ergeben Marketingkampagnen nach Schema F, daher Stagnation und Frustration

    Rat an das Management

    Relax, you´re rich :-)


  2. „Engineer”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Befürwortet Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Rakuten

    Pros

    International, a lot of services

    Kontras

    Japanese culture is strong, not too good for engineer


  3. „Good place to grow”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Empfiehlt
    Neutrale Prognose
    Keine Meinung zu Geschäftsführer

    Ich habe in Vollzeit bei Rakuten gearbeitet

    Pros

    Continue to challenge for new technology.
    Project speed is so high!

    Kontras

    Many overtime work.
    The person who go back early is looked coldly by team member.


  4. War das hilfreich? Die Community freut sich über jeden Beitrag – Bewertung hinzufügen (anonym)


  5. „Fair and decent”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter

    Pros

    Good environment for working

    Kontras

    Nothing comes to my head


  6. „Good place to start your career”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Empfiehlt nicht
    Negative Prognose
    Stimmt gegen Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Rakuten

    Pros

    Free food, gym access, if you have a good manager you can grow a lot

    Kontras

    Not good incentives, forced stock options instead of cash for bonuses, lots of circlejerking at asakai, bad promotion system that favors age vs skill.


  7. Hilfreich (1)

    „Starting to lose faith”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Empfiehlt
    Neutrale Prognose
    Befürwortet Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Rakuten

    Pros

    -Have great colleagues
    -Nice cafeterias, company events to help build relationships amongst colleagues
    -Like the trainings offered by the tech teams
    -

    Kontras

    -Constant change in managers
    -Employees are treated unfairly by managers and executives (e.g. favoritism)
    -Suggestions are not even considered and often dismissed without any reasons

    Rat an das Management

    -Please treat everyone with respect


  8. Hilfreich (1)

    „Japan's largest e-commerce company”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Software Engineer in Tokio (Japan)
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Software Engineer in Tokio (Japan)
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Befürwortet Geschäftsführer

    Ich habe in Vollzeit bei Rakuten gearbeitet (Über 3 Jahre)

    Pros

    Open positions and new opportunities to work on different projects inside and outside Japan

    Kontras

    Depending on locations and departments, it might be difficult to discuss complicated issues if you don't know Japanese


  9. Hilfreich (75)

    „Black hole for your career”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Business Development in San Mateo, CA (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Business Development in San Mateo, CA (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)
    Empfiehlt nicht
    Negative Prognose
    Stimmt gegen Geschäftsführer

    Ich habe in Vollzeit bei Rakuten gearbeitet (mehr als ein Jahr)

    Pros

    There seems to be serious commitment (in terms of both declared strategy and actual deployment of resources) to growing the brand outside of Japan. If you like being a part of that sort of thing, the energy is there, at least for now.

    The CEO is very visible. Whatever you think of him, a visible CEO is better than the kind who never shows his face on the business floor.

    If you have any interest in anthropology or corporate ethnography, the exposure to the Japanese management culture can be informative, and help you understand the relative rhyme and reason of American corporate orders more objectively. Even the US office is full of Japanese expats and other international employees, so you’ll get the lessons of an international/cross-cultural experience.

    If you want to hide, you can hide at Rakuten. You could go on cruise control for 10 years and no one would notice or care. It’s a relatively low-competition environment, so if you’re a minor-league player who wants to feel like a star, Rakuten could be the place to do that.

    Catered (convenient, tasty, moderately healthy) breakfast and lunch every day; dinner available if you have to work past 7pm.

    They recently implemented a great maternity/paternity leave policy (four months I think?), a new “rewards” system to celebrate employee tenure (in the US office), etc. They do employee events and stuff to make it fun and social. The mid-level corp comms and HR people are mostly American (in the US office), and you can tell they try hard to make it a positive environment. They are doing the best they can given the constraints they face from the executive level.

    Kontras

    CEO’s attitude and influence is the engine of the whole company, and unfortunately he is a narcissist, a bully, and a buffoon. He marches around with a “support staff” of yes-men who he openly treats like servants. Every week he gives a “speech” in front of the whole company (mandatory attendance unless you have express permission from your manager to miss it) in which he just parrots the latest Silicon Valley jargon (“We need to focus on innovation,” "Artificial intelligence is going to change our industry," etc). Presents himself as a visionary leader but is obviously only imitating industry trends. He constantly name-drops his “friends” (tech celebrities from more prestigious companies, pop stars, etc). It’s embarrassing, like watching a very rich and clueless child. He has publicly disapproved of Donald Trump’s politics, but he is comparable to Trump in character and behavior. Imagine working for a Japanese Trump; that’s about what it feels like to work at Rakuten.

    Increasing Japanese influence on the US work environment, both in terms of policies and in terms of the ratio of Japanese expat employees to American employees. Makes it clear that the Japanese run this ship, and the Americans just work here. There is a massive culture gap between the Japanese and everyone else, and it seems to be widening rather than narrowing. Even in the US office, the most influential executives are Japanese, and speak Japanese among themselves in the office. It creates a feeling of alienation and the sense that the real decisions are made behind a culture barrier without much respect for what’s on the non-Japanese side of it.

    Salary is below market. I joined after being laid-off from another firm, so I felt vulnerable and desperate at the time. In retrospect, I should have held out for something better. The income I might have lost by waiting for another offer is minimal compared to what I lost by working at a below-market salary for two years.

    No career-pathing to speak of. None. Zero. No formal system or structure to help employees progress, and individual managers have no incentives to develop junior employees, or even the tools to do so should they wish to at their own initiatives. You could have the same job at Rakuten for 10 years; it’s not a ladder, it’s a hamster wheel.

    Just bewilderingly disorganized for a company of its size. A hundred layers of process and approval for the simplest projects. Takes forever to get anything done, ten people to do one person’s job, etc.

    There are countless meetings where ten people will fill up a conference room and dial-in from three offices across a dozen time zones just to listen to one person read bullet points off a power point screen for 30 minutes. No discussion, no problem solving, no decision making--just brain damage all around. If you have the temerity to ask “What is the purpose of this meeting?” they look at you like you’re breaking some kind of rule and tell you that “information sharing is very important.” Ever heard of email, you muppets??? I’m in my 30s so too young to have experienced office culture in the 1990s, but I imagine Rakuten is probably a good approximation. You could just go watch the movie Office Space, or you could work at Rakuten. One is a comedy, the other is your life.

    I came into Rakuten from another large e-commerce company, one that I would describe as a well-run, professionally managed, first-rate corporate organization. (Not the most prestigious brand in Silicon Valley these days, mind you, but on the inside it was still a first-rate place.) The contrast between that experience and Rakuten shocked me. In comparison, Rakuten is a clumsy, amateurish, third-rate organization. Don’t let the size and global reach of the company fool you. On the inside, it is amateur hour.

    I came in with lots of energy and enthusiasm, expecting to grow my skills and contribute to an industry-leading program. It looked great on paper. In reality it felt like I had gone back to high school. I was seriously worried that my business skills would actually atrophy at Rakuten due to the general ineptitude and outdated business culture that forms the infrastructure of the company. Luckily I was in an external-facing role, so I was able to keep up my chops by interfacing with outside firms, otherwise I probably would have come out less skilled than when I went in. It’s like an anti-MBA, just cramming your head full of redundant processes and dysfunctional practices.

    The frustration level in trying to get anything done is off the charts. Rakuten is the most sluggish, backwards, illogical, outdated, frustrating business environment I have ever been exposed to. And that’s speaking from a biz dev perspective where I regularly engaged with other firms and their managers as part of my work. Every firm has its quirks, and some are more/less effective than others, of course, but God, Rakuten is just a mess. It was embarrassing to have to share some of our practices with potential business partners when scoping joint projects. They would just look at me across the table in disbelief/frustration. I was actually told sarcastically by a channel partner, "Congratulations on having the most complicated pricing structure of any marketplace worldwide." You could replace "pricing structure" with just about any element of our company and the sentence holds true. So many questions to which there is no answer other than "That's the way we do it at Rakuten." So many instances of "Why couldn't we just..." to which the executive answer is always "No," without any explanation or rationale. Utter lack of flexibility in problem solving or decision making, it's like they froze everybody's brain in 1995, hired ten thousand lawyers and accountants to make sure it stayed that way, and asked Franz Kafka to consult on the whole deal just to make 100% sure everything stayed as rigid and opaque as possible.

    Toward the end all of the above really started to affect my overall mood and psychological condition. I felt like I had taken a step down in life. I saw so much grinding stupidity at Rakuten that I just got depressed. I thought I would never get away from it. It became difficult for me to get another job, partly because it was hard to advertise myself as successful when I was immersed in an unsuccessful environment. (How can you explain that everything you’ve tried to initiate for the past two years has been stymied by bureaucracy and Japanese executives who make decisions from 6000 miles away about markets they don’t understand and clients they can barely communicate with?) I really thought for a while that Rakuten had ruined my career. When I finally got a solid offer to leave, I almost cried with joy and relief, and my self-esteem shot up about 1000%. How’s that for a KPI?

    Rat an das Management

    One of the most eye-opening things I heard at Rakuten was when a Japanese colleague, who had joined the company mid-career from another firm, confessed to me over a drink that, “this is not management.” (Meaning that the type of management practiced at Rakuten was not even worthy of the term, compared to the firm he came from.) For American employees to feel repelled by the company’s management culture is one thing, but when even the Japanese can recognize that management at Rakuten is a joke, you know something is seriously wrong. The whole place is run like the mafia, with the CEO as the Don. He pushes the neanderthal culture down through the whole company. Short of the board replacing the CEO, I don’t think there’s much that can be done to change things.


  10. Hilfreich (3)

    „One of the best Employers for Foreigners in Japan”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Product Management in Tokio (Japan)
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Product Management in Tokio (Japan)
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Befürwortet Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Rakuten (Weniger als ein Jahr)

    Pros

    1. Well Planned and Relaxed Office Culture
    2. Ability to focus on Individual development as well as development of overall business
    3. Great global footprint

    Kontras

    Slow moving and inflexible

    Technology and Product mindset lacking

    Rat an das Management

    Focus on building Product and Technology and not only on Branding


  11. Hilfreich (1)

    „Associate developer”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Rakuten

    Pros

    good company, good exposure to projects

    Kontras

    no good projects to work on


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